Baby food fad diet

By | August 23, 2020

baby food fad diet

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Diets come and go, and it seems that with every passing year a new fad in healthy eating hits the headlines. Only a few regimes manage to remain in vogue for any length of time, but one that became popular earlier this decade and which still has its adherents is the baby food diet. There are various suggestions on how to maintain the baby food diet, but the general rule seems to be that one or two meals a day, as well as snacks, should be replaced with jars of baby food, followed by a full healthy dinner. Some sites suggest eating as many as 14 jars a day. Baby foods normally contain no more than calories per jar, and as they come in small amounts they help with portion control. Typically they are natural foods, free of preservatives or additives, which have been pureed to make them easy to digest. Any baby foods can be eaten, but most online information recommends as broad a mixture of food types as possible — certainly meats for protein, fruit and vegetables. Being a vegetarian or vegan on the baby food diet is fairly easy, but beware: plant sources of protein, like beans and soy products, aren’t typically found in baby food, so be prepared to find your protein from other sources. Most fruit and vegetable baby food should be free of gluten, but check labels to be certain.

Diet baby food fad

Some people eat a few jars of baby food each day as low-calorie snacks, and others use baby food up to 14 jars of it! The baby food diet hit the Internet in The rumor was that actor Jennifer Aniston had used the diet to drop a quick seven pounds, at the suggestion of her trainer. Other celebrities followed suit and soon more people were trying the trend. The diet is meant to be a quick “cleanse” or reset, not a long-term style of eating.

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